Worth Reading, Mostly Economics, for April 21, 2010
Hoisted from the Archives: Eric Boehlert on Mike Allen in November 2006

Ann Marie Marciarille: Whose Death Is It Anyway? Medical-Legal Conflict in the Implementation of End-of-Life Decision Making

At Boalt Hall, April 19. Sponsored by CHEFS:

Ann Marie Marciarille: Whose Death Is It Anyway? Medical-Legal Conflict in the Implementation of End-of-Life Decision Making: This event is being Co-Sponsored with the Boalt Healthcare & Biotech Law Society. .The debate over the 2010 health care reform legislation sharpened public discussion on end-of-life decision making for many Americans. Attorneys—practitioners and academics alike—emphasize the values of autonomy and independence in end-of-life decision making and the role of attorneys and courts. But the private implementation of legal documents designed to foster these values can be highly problematic for health care practitioners, family members, and even patients themselves. Why is this? Why is there such a powerful disconnect between rhetoric and implementation on end-of-life decision making? What role does the law play in fostering this disconnect? What role might health care payment systems play?

Join us for a thought-provoking conversation on these topics.

Professor Marciarille will be teaching Health Care Law at Berkeley Law School in the fall of 2010.

Ann Marie Marciarille: Whose Death Is It Anyway? Medical-Legal Conflict in the Implementation of End-of-Life Decision Making from Ann Marie Marciarille on Vimeo.

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