Reading Notes on Dasgupta, "Economics: A Very Short Introduction": Markets
Reading Notes on Dasgupta, "Economics: A Very Short Introduction": Households and Firms

Reading Notes on Dasgupta, "Economics: A Very Short Introduction": Science and technology as institutions

Discussion Questions:

  • Given that knowledge is non-rival--if I teach it to you, I don't have any less of it than I did before--what justification could there possibly be for charging people for access to knowledge and its uses?
  • If people weren't allowed to charge others for access to knowledge and its uses, would there be any reason to think that society would be putting a properly-large share of our resources into creating and disseminating knowledge?
  • Why can contests and the rule of priority be good ways to spur the creation and dissemination of knowledge?
  • How well do contests and the rule of priority fit with a private-property market economy?

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