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Florence Wyman Richardson Usher

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Scrapbooks, 1909-1913:

Florence Wyman Richardson Usher helped found the Equal Suffrage League of St. Louis in 1910. She chaired the League's lecture committee for six years and was a member of the board of governors in 1912. The scrapbooks document suffrage activities both nationally and in St. Louis. They include newsclippings, correspondence, public notices, programs, leaflets, and Usher's annotations.

In 1907 Florence Wyman Richardson began writing letters to prominent women's social clubs in St. Louis inquiring about other women who might share her interest in the woman suffrage movement. She worked with Victoria Conkling Whitney, an "old-time" suffragist, on a federal petition drive for a suffrage amendment in 1909. Whitney encouraged her to revive the local chapter of the National American Women Suffrage Association (NAWSA) and speak out for woman suffrage. Richardson wrote NAWSA and a national organizer responded, amazed that the request was from a nineteen year old girl. When she lectured in support of English suffragettes in 1910, the newspapers noted her fashionable dress and her status as a Veiled Prophet debutante and niece of the St. Louis Postmaster. That same year she founded the Equal Suffrage League of St. Louis with ten other women, including her mother (also named Florence Wyman Richardson) who served as the League's first president.

Richardson married Dr. Roland Usher in June, 1910 and continued her suffrage work as Mrs. Roland Usher. She chaired the League's lecture committee for six years and sat on its board of governors in 1912. She wrote a campaign leaflet, "A Question of Fitness", which the NAWSA printed for mass distribution in 1913. After the passage of the nineteenth amendment. Usher transferred her energies to civil rights and was an active member of the Urban League during the 1920's and 1930's. Her name was included on a bronze tablet dedicated in Jefferson City to honor Missouri suffrage pioneers in 1931. Usher died in 1968.

The scrapbooks document woman suffrage activities both locally and nationally. They are arranged chronologically and contain news- clippings, correspondence, public notices, programs, leaflets, and Usher's annotations.


In Her Place A Guide to St Louis Women s History Katharine T Corbett Google BooksIn Her Place A Guide to St Louis Women s History Katharine T Corbett Google BooksIn Her Place A Guide to St Louis Women s History Katharine T Corbett Google Books

In Her Place A Guide to St Louis Women s History Katharine T Corbett Google Books


History of Woman Suffrage 1900 1920 Google Books

History of Woman Suffrage 1900 1920 Google Books History of Woman Suffrage 1900 1920 Google Books

History of Woman Suffrage 1900 1920 Google Books

History of Woman Suffrage 1900 1920 Google Books


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