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Tim Duy Presents: Oregon Economic Forum: What I Am Caffeinating Up to Prepare for at the Roasterie XVII: October 23, 2013: Luna de Oro Blend

Oregon Economic Forum: After the Recession: Opportunities and Challenges

The 10th Annual Oregon Economic Forum
Thursday, October 24, 2013
Portland Art Museum
0745am-1130am
Doors open at 0700am. Breakfast Served.

Come join us for our 10th Anniversary.

This summer will mark the fourth year of the recovery.  Four years of slow economic growth that defied early-expectations of a rapid rebound.  But while fiscal contraction is dragging down overall growth, momentum in the private sector is building.  The long-awaited return to a more normal recovery may finally be at hand.

What challenges and opportunities lay ahead?  This year’s Oregon Economic Forum brings together an exciting group of speakers to answer this question.

We start close to home, as Josh Lenher of the Oregon State Office of Economic Analysis looks at how the composition of the Oregon labor market has changed relative to the US and what it might mean for the Oregon economy moving forward.

Then we move to the global stage and satisfy the thirst for on-the-ground knowledge of Asian economies.  Jim Mullinax, Political and Economic Section Chief at the U.S. Consulate General in Shanghai will review the changing Chinese economy and what it means for Oregon firms looking to do business overseas.

And in a return visit, University of California Economics Professor Brad DeLong will look at what we can expect as the economy returns--hopefully--to something that looks more "normal."

In addition, we will include presentations by University of Oregon economists, Forum Director Tim Duy and Professor Jeremy Piger, that further increase our understanding of the Oregon economy and what’s in store for 2014.

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