Noted for Your Morning Procrastination for November 14, 2013
Hanging Out with a Little Free Time Between Appointments at 17th & Penn. Caribou Coffee...

Herbert Hoover Is a Very Naughty Boy: Thursday Whiskey-Tango-Foxtrot-Bang-Query-Bang-Query Weblogging

From Herbert Hoover (2011)Freedom Betrayed: Herbert Hoover's Secret History of the Second World War and Its Aftermath:

Ambassador Grew's repeated warming that the Japanese would commit hara-kiri rather than submit to American dictation or starvation came true. They struck at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. President Roosevelt, addressing the Congress on December 8, asked for a declaration of war with the Japanese Empire. And on December 11, the President asked for declarations of war on Germany and Italy. We were in the Second World War with Communist Russia and the British Empire as our major allies…

No mention of the December 11, 1941 declaration of war on the United States by Adolf Hitler, Herbert? Did that slip your mind?

The German Charg d'Affaires,: Dr. Hans Thomsen, and the First Secretary of the German Embassy, Mr. von Strempel, called at the State Department at 8:00 A.M. on December 11, 1941. The Secretary, otherwise engaged, directed that they be received by the Chief of the European Division of the State Department, Mr. Ray Atherton. Mr. Atherton received the German representatives at 9:30 A.M. The German representatives handed to Mr. Atherton a copy of a note that is being delivered this morning, December 11, to the American Charg d'Affaires in Berlin. Dr. Thomsen said that Germany considers herself in a state of war with the United States...

And Stanford's David M. Kennedy is naughty as well:

[Herbert Hoover's] Freedom Betrayed offers vivid proof of William Faulkner’s famous dictum that “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” For those who might think that history has settled the mantle of consensus around the events of the World War II era, Hoover’s iconoclastic narrative will come as an unsettling reminder that much controversy remains. By turns quirky and astute, in prose that is often acerbic and unfailingly provocative, Hoover opens some old wounds and inflicts a few new ones of his own, while assembling a passionate case for the tragic errors of Franklin Roosevelt’s diplomacy. Not all readers will be convinced, but Freedom Betrayed is must-read...

Why not simply say: "a fascinating glimpse into the mind of ex-President Herbert Hoover as an aged wingnut", David?

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