A 2% Inflation Target Is too Low: Hoisted from the Archives from 2011
Things to Read on the Morning of April 29, 2014

Governor Beshear: 413,000 sign up for health care in Kentucky: Live from The Roasterie CXLIII: April 29, 2014

Adam Beam: FRANKFORT, Ky.: Beshear: 413,000 sign up for health care in Ky: "Beth Moore left her job - and her health insurance...

...to start her own company in January. In March, while visiting Texas, she had an emergency appendectomy followed by a nasty bout with pneumonia that added up to more than $30,000 in medical bills. But Moore was one of 413,410 Kentuckians who signed up for free or subsidized health insurance through kynect, Kentucky's state-run health insurance marketplace made possible by the federal Affordable Care Act. So far, the most she has paid for her treatment is $150. "If I had not had insurance (it) would have been catastrophic for me," Moore said. "I'm very grateful that I am a resident of Kentucky and that this was an option for me."

Moore told her story alongside Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear and other state officials Tuesday who were celebrating the end of the open-enrollment period of Kentucky's health insurance marketplace.... "We're going to keep enrolling people until everybody in Kentucky who needs health coverage has it," Beshear said. About 80 percent of those 413,410 people have their health insurance through Medicaid, meaning the state and federal government pays for their health care. The other 20 percent purchased private plans, but - thanks to a government subsidy - at a discounted rate...

I am wondering: how soon before we begin to see the signal emerging from the noise as states that implement the ACA start pulling ahead, economically, of the others? Enrico Moretti tells me that in the long run each additional state "export" job comes with five other jobs. And from the perspective of a state, a federal government-financed healthcare job is a regional "export". ACA subsidy plus Medicaid expansion do look to approach 1% of GDP in implementing states. And Chodorow Reich et al. definitely find that federal Medicaid dollars matter a lot in the short (Keynesian) run, and that also means they matter even more in the long (resource shift) run...

Plus: would Beshear make a good president?

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