Reading: Guillaume Daudin et al.: Globalization 1870-1914
Reading: Robert Allen (2011): Global Economic History: A Very Short Introduction, chapter 9

Robert Allen (2011): Global Economic History: A Very Short Introduction, Epilogue

Robert Allen (2011): Global Economic History: A Very Short Introduction (New York: Oxford), Epilogue http://amzn.to/2iloEx6

Five Questions:

  1. Assuming that GDP per capita in the "rich" countries--what we will not be able to call the (extended) North Atlantic for much longer--continues to grow at about 2%/year, how rich will the rich be come 2050 or 2100?
  2. What other countries are likely to have joined the rich, or at least be within hailing distance?
  3. What will life be like in countries that will not have "converged"?
  4. How have countries successfully closed the gaps with the (extended) North Atlantic--in education, in capital, and in productivity--in the past?
  5. What has kept other countries from closing these gaps? What are the prospects for them closing these gaps in the future?

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