Must-Read: The shared omerta among former The Old New Republic editors—those who had the title and were supposed to be running the office—Michael Kinsley, Hendrick Hertzberg, Andrew Sullivan, Chick Lane, Peter Beinart, Franklin Foer, and Richard Just—is quite something. For people who have made their professional lives out of bing willing to say strident and contrarian things about pretty much anything on the drop of their hat, their collective and individual silence is quite remarkable:

Sarah Wildman: I was harassed at the [Old] New Republic. I spoke up. Nothing happened: "Last week, I reached out to [Peter] Beinart, who now teaches journalism at the City University of New York and is a contributing editor at the Atlantic and a columnist for the Forward...

...He quickly confirmed that I'd come to him at the time.

"Fifteen years ago,” he texted me in a formal statement:

Sarah Wildman brought a deeply troubling incident regarding Leon Wieseltier to my attention. I was not Leon’s boss. We both served under Marty Peretz, the owner and editor in chief. Feeling I had a legal obligation to report the incident, I informed Marty and insisted that he come to Washington to tell Leon that such behavior was unacceptable. The three of us met but Marty did not take meaningful action. I am not saying this to exonerate myself. I should have done far more. I was complicit in an institutional culture that lacked professional procedures regarding sexual harassment, and which victimized women, including women I considered friends. I will always be ashamed of that, and will ensure that I am never similarly complicit again.

Peretz, reached by phone, insisted to a Vox editor, “Peter never, ever, ever reported this to me.” The former owner, who sold the last of his shares in the magazine in 2012, declined to speculate on the wave of allegations against Wieseltier. “I don’t know what’s true and what’s not,” Peretz said. He added, “I don’t remember Sarah Wildman.”

Vox reached out to Wieseltier by email and text. He did not respond to repeated requests for comment...

When I told Beinart my story, his response, it seemed to me, was perplexed at best, panicked at worst. He told me he felt compelled, legally, to launch some sort of investigation. But it all felt ad hoc. At some point, someone—I believe it was Peter, though he no longer recalls this—advised me that I should tell Wieseltier I had said something, lest he be caught unaware. So I stopped by his office. It proved an awful idea. Wieseltier was cold. He wanted to know why. As in: Why would I have said anything? In my recollection, he told me that I was acting like a child....

Soon after that miserable conversation, a meeting was held in Wieseltier’s office—I was there, with him and Beinart. (Beinart also described to me a different, earlier, meeting, between him, Peretz, and Wieseltier held explicitly to discuss this incident. Peretz, however, denies he was ever informed at all.) In my presence, Wieseltier told the higher-ups that his marriage was a happy one, that he had no reason to be untoward. Of that night, he said we had merely “shared” a kiss. I remember that word. It was so breezy. It was so easy. It was so nothing. It was practically a lark...

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