Regional Economics: Some Fairly-Recent Must- and Should-Reads

stacks and stacks of books

  • I am genuinely confused here: Do we have an "eastern heartland" problem? Or do we have a "prime age male joblessness" problem? Those two problems would seem to me to call for different kinds of responses. yet Summers, Glaeser, and Austin are smooshing them into one: Edward L. Glaeser, Lawrence H. Summers and Ben Austin: A Rescue Plan for a Jobs Crisis in the Heartland: "In Flint, Mich., over 35 percent of prime-aged men—between 25 and 54—are not employed...
  • Successful place-based policies require what we used to call "local boosters". One problem with so much of the so-called "Red States" is that the local rich are no longer boosters for their communities—indeed, no longer feel a part of the community in any meaningful way: Noah Smith: How to Save the Troubled American Heartland: "James Fallows and Deborah Fallows... notice a number of common approaches among towns that are on the mend. Two of these... universities and immigration...

  • Seattle is pursuing (a version of) social democracy in one metropolitan area. In the 2010s we learned from some of our laboratories of democracy (cough, Kansas, Wisconsin) what really not to do. Will Seattle provide a model for what we should do?: Hilary Wething: Seattle: Paid Sick Leave And Workers’ Earnings Dynamics: "Utilize administrative data from Washington state to study the impact of Seattle’s paid sick time ordinance on...

  • The states have been serving as laboratories of democracy over the past decade, with Wisconsin and Kansas seeing the greatest policy swerves and serving as the most striking ominous warnings: David Cooper: As Wisconsin’s and Minnesota’s lawmakers took divergent paths, so did their economies: Since 2010, Minnesota’s economy has performed far better for working families than Wisconsin’s: "Seven years removed from when each governor took office, there is ample data to assess which state’s economy—and by extension, which set of policies—delivered more for the welfare of its residents. The results could not be more clear: by virtually every available measure, Minnesota’s recovery has outperformed Wisconsin’s..."

  • Sixty years ago American states—at least California—made provision for moving into an era of the knowlege-based economy: A Master Plan for Higher Education in California

  • I can't help it. Every time I see a 60 plus male from the South or the Midwest, I cannot help but think: "There goes an easily grifted moron!" The strong that has to be rolled uphill to keep Trumpland from falling further behind the rest of the country is very large and heavy: Paul Krugman: What’s the Matter With Trumpland?: "Regional convergence in per-capita incomes has stopped dead. And the relative economic decline of lagging regions has been accompanied by growing social problems...

  • Noah Smith: "This is just incredible: @davidminpdx: 'East New York's 129-day stretch without a murder is the longest since the NYPD began keeping modern records'...

  • Noah Smith: How Universities Make Cities Great: "Abel and Deitz find that university research expenditures have a strong effect on the number of educated people in a region—over four times as strong as the effect of degree production...

  • John Austin: A tale of two Rust Belts: Diverging economic paths shaping community politics: "Some communities have assets (and have advanced strategies to build on those assets)...

  • Paul Krugman: The Gambler’s Ruin of Small Cities: "Once... towns and small cities... served as central places serving a mainly rural population engaged in agriculture and other natural resource-based activities...

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