The empirical evidence so far seems to be telling us that policies prohibiting employers from knowing early about applicants' criminal records may be leading to employers not looking at all at young Black men. If this holds up, it would be very distressing and suggest strongly that such policies are truly counterproductive: Jennifer L. Doleac: Empirical Evidence on the Effects of "Ban the Box": "I have prepared this written testimony to review existing empirical evidence on policies that prohibit employers from asking job applicants about their criminal records until late in the hiring process...

...This evidence can be summarized as follows: Delaying information about job applicants’ criminal histories leads employers to statistically discriminate against groups that are more likely to have a recent conviction. This reduces employment for young, low-skilled, black men. This negative effect is driven by a reduction in employment for young, low-skilled, black men who don’t have criminal records.... Current evidence suggests that Ban the Box may not increase employment for people with criminal records, and might even reduce it. Effective approaches to this policy problem are likely to be policies that directly address employers’ concerns about hiring people with criminal records, such as investing in rehabilitation, providing more information about applicants’ work-readiness, and clarifying employers’ legal responsibilities...


#noted

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