July 12, 2019: Weekly Forecasting Update

Victory in the Latin War of 340-338 as the big sign that things had changed, and that Rome was now a very special and unusual power and social formation?: Gary Forsythe: A Critical History of Early Rome   : "The smaller Latin states, such as Lanuvium, Aricia, Pedum, and Nomentum, were directly incorporated into the Roman state, as had happened with Tusculum in 381 B.C.... retain[ing] their traditional political institutions and... govern[ing] their own local affairs. The two largest Latin states, Tibur and Praeneste, which in the past had rivaled Rome in Latium... were left nominally independent as Latin allies... bound to Rome by bilateral treaties.... Sutrium, Nepet, Ardea, Circeii, Signia, and Setia retained their status as Latin colonies on the confines of the Ager Romanus. But Roman territory was further increased by annexing Antium and Velitrae. A small Roman maritime colony was established at Antium to guard the coast.... The censors... created two new tribes, the Maecia and the Scaptia...

Rome... continued the practice of founding Latin colonies during the course of its conquest of Italy, in order to secure strategic areas. The inhabitants of these colonies collectively formed the new Latium in Roman law. They enjoyed the same legal rights (commercium, conubium, and ius migrandi) with respect to the Roman state as had the original Latins... but they were individually bound to Rome by bilateral treaties and were subject to Roman military recruitment. These later Latin colonies played a very important role... in Rome’s conquest of... [and] in the Romanization of Italy....

The Romans likewise continued the communal religious traditions of the Latins by having the consuls conduct the Latin festival every year at the Alban Mount, as well as yearly rites to Vesta and the Penates at Lavinium. The... growth of the mythical tradition that Rome had been colonized from Alba Longa, which in turn had been founded by Lavinium.. [and] the Trojan ancestry of the Latin people. Rome had been described as a Trojan foundation by the Greek mythographer, Hellanicus of Lesbos, as early as the second half of the fifth century B.C. (Dion. Hal. 1.45.4–48.1 and 1.72.2). We do not know when the Romans first began to regard themselves as being of Trojan descent, and when this notion was generally embraced by the Latins, but the process of this myth’s genesis probably dates at least as far back as the late fourth century B.C.... Dionysius (1.64.4–5) indicates that Aeneas received worship at Lavinium at an earthen mound thought to be his grave...


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