At a conference I am at, my fellow berkeley professor and former President's Council of Economic Advisor's Chair Laura D. Tyson gave a powerful endorsement and shout-out to this book by my fellow Berkeley professor Barry Eichengreen, as the best survey of the history and prospect of what he calls "populism" and I would call "neo-fascism": Barry Eichengreen: The Populist Temptation: Economic Grievance and Political Reaction in the Modern Era: "Focuses on the global resurgence of populism today and places it in a deep context.... Populists tend to thrive most in the wake of economic downturns, when it is easy to convince the masses of elite malfeasance. Yet while there is more than a grain of truth that bankers, financiers, and 'bought' politicians are responsible for the mess, populists' own solutions tend to be simplistic and economically counterproductive. Moreover, by arguing that the ordinary people are at the mercy of extra-national forces beyond their control—international capital, immigrants, cosmopolitan globalists—populists often degenerate into demagoguery and xenophobia. There is no one solution... [but] there is an obvious place to start: shoring up and improving the welfare state.... America's patchwork welfare state was not well equipped to deal with the economic fallout that attended globalization and the decline of manufacturing in America.... Lucidly explaining both the appeals and dangers of populism across history, this book is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand not just the populist phenomenon, but more generally the lasting political fallout that follows in the wake of major economic crises...


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