I agree with Larry Glickman here: Talking your book is never good. And monopsony is not freedom—not even if the monopsonist works for you: Lawrence Glickman: "I have questions about this piece by @tylercowen: https://t.co/UllO6J28my: Why must very wealthy universities 'choose between boosting their academic quality through better training, or paying them higher stipends and teaching wages to ease their immediate financial concerns'? Why is it an inherently zero sum situation? Why can't they do both? You write, 'I would merely note that many of my graduate students come from relatively well-to-do backgrounds and face favorable prospects after they graduate'. First, anecdotes about your grad students is not the best basis for policy making. Second, presumably you do not want to live in a world in which grad school is only feasible for the 'well-to-do'. Third, your students may face 'favorable' job prospects, but there is a huge jobs crisis in the humanities that you may have read about. Grad students may not be 'employees in the traditional sense', but the category of "employees in in the traditional sense" is shrinking. There are many more Whole Foods employees than coal miners. Unions work just as well for the former as the latter...

Balu Puppy: The tell is in the pompously worded & patronizing footnote: "I have been overseeing graduate students,using them as research assistants & raising money to support them in varying roles, for about 30 yrs at George Mason, where there is no such union"...

SMW: This is “job creator” ideology dressed up in paternalistic condescension. Note it only applies to private schools... also note the emphasis on wages—an important part, to be sure, but unions protect grads in so many other ways...


#noted

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