I disagree profoundly with the "you are [a team player], and don’t let your university exploit that". I am not separate from and being exploited by the university. I am the university. It has no hands and voices in this world without me, and people like me. It's certainly the case that other tasks can and do have higher priorities right now than being the university's hands and voice. But when those tasks are done—or, rather, when those tasks are not doable in the current moment—then working hard under unexpected conditions to fulfill as much as possible of the university's contract with its students is what I signed up to do. Otherwise, the advice is very good: Rebecca Barrett-Fox: Please Do a Bad Job of Putting Your Courses Online https://anygoodthing.com/2020/03/12/please-do-a-bad-job-of-putting-your-courses-online/: 'I’m absolutely serious.... You are NOT building an online class. You are NOT teaching students who can be expected to be ready to learn online. And, most importantly, your class is NOT the highest priority of their OR your life right now.... If you are getting sucked into the pedagogy of online learning or just now discovering that there are some pretty awesome tools out there to support students online, stop. Stop now. Ask yourself: Do I really care about this? (Probably not, or else you would have explored it earlier.) Or am I trying to prove that I’m a team player? (You are, and don’t let your university exploit that.)...

...Remember the following as you move online: Your students know less about technology than you think.... They will be accessing the internet on their phones. They have limited data. They need to reserve it for things more important than online lectures.... Some of your students will get sick. Others will be caring for people who are ill. Many will be parenting. Social isolation contributes to mental health problems. Social isolation contributes to domestic violence. Students will be losing their jobs, especially those in tourism and hospitality. All of these factors mean that your students are facing more important battles today than your class—if they are even able to access it....

Do not require synchronous work. Students should not need to show up at a specific time for anything. REFUSE to do any synchronous work.... Do not record lectures unless you need to.... They take up a lot of resources on your end and on theirs.... Do record lectures if you need to.... Rremember that your students will be frequently interrupted in their listening, so a good rule is 1 concept per lecture.... Make all work due on the same day and time for the rest of the semester. I recommend Sunday night at 11:59 pm.... Do NOT require students to use online proctoring or force them to have themselves recorded during exams or quizzes. This is a fundamental violation of their privacy, and they did NOT sign up for that when they enrolled in your course.... Make everything self-grading if you can (yes, multiple choice and T/F on quizzes and tests) or low-stakes (completed/not completed).... Listen for them asking for help.... This advice is very different from that which I would share if you were designing an online course. I hope it’s helpful, and for those of you moving your courses online, I hope it helps you understand the labor that is required in building an online course a bit better...


#noted #2020-03-19

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