Scott: Coronavirus Cases Are Rising, But Covid-19 Deaths Are Falling. What’s Going On?—Noted
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Stafford: Quentin’s Zoom Webinar Checklist—Noted

Quentin Stafford: Quentin’s Zoom Webinar Checklist https://statusq.org/archives/2020/07/05/9701/:

  • [Consider] Webinar mode... a paid add-on,... [with] an Eventbrite-style registration system, polls, Q&A chat windows, post-call surveys, the ability to livestream to YouTube, etc.
  • Make sure your camera is around eye-level or higher. Laptop users, I’m looking at you!...
  • Make sure there’s more light in front of you than there is behind you.
  • Use ethernet rather than wifi if you possibly can.
  • Use a decent microphone....
  • Avoid distracting (or boring) backgrounds.
  • Don’t use virtual backgrounds or automatic blurring.
  • Mute yourself when your microphone isn’t needed....
  • Have at least one trial session!... You, any speakers, and one or two other helpers. You want everyone to know what it’s like to be a panelist, and what it’s like to be an attendee. Things you’ll want to find out:
  • Can attendees take part in the chat?
  • If so, will that distract the speaker?
  • If, instead, you’re using the Q&A window, who sees what and when?
  • Have one of your test attendees submit questions and answer them privately, publicly, or reject them. What do they see?
  • Suppose you want to allow an attendee to say something using audio, how do you do it?
  • How much of this will the speaker be able to see when they’re sharing their Powerpoint presentation?
  • If they have a video embedded in their presentation, will everyone hear its audio?
  • You need more than just two of you to try this kind of thing out.
  • Don’t hold your trial session just before the event!
  • If your speakers are going to be sharing their screen, test that out in advance with every speaker.
  • Giving the talk, running the meeting, and collating questions are three jobs and ideally need three people.
  • You will get lots of last-minute requests for the meeting link, no matter how many times you’ve sent it out beforehand. Have it to hand at all times.
  • reate a TinyURL link to it in case you have to text it to someone at short notice.
  • Consider disaster scenarios.
  • Make yourself a checklist.
  • Are you recording this? Have you notified everyone? Will you make it available afterwards?
  • Do you want attendees to be able to use the chat? Turn it off if not.
  • Do you want attendees to be able to use/see the Q&A window? Set appropriately.
  • Have you enabled screen-sharing for participants? That’s an option on the host’s screen-sharing menu.
  • Tell the panel: turn off your phone, turn off notifications on your desktop and quit all other apps, make sure your family and dog know you’re not to be disturbed.
  • Make contingency plans so you aren’t distracted if your doorbell rings?
  • Tell the attendees: whether you’re recording the meeting, whether the video will be available, where the video will be available, whether you’re using Zoom’s ‘Raise Hand’ feature, and how you’re handling Q&A.
  • Have a backup plan for what to do if something suddenly goes badly wrong?
  • ‘Spotlight’ the current speaker’s video.
  • ‘Spotlighting’ the speaker’s video is a good safety measure to stop unexpected switches when somebody’s dog barks in the background after you forgot to mute them!
  • Think about how you are going to finish the meeting professionally. Consider the final words you want to be ringing in hundreds of people’s ears as they depart.
  • Beware the still-live microphones and cameras.
  • Stick around afterwards for a while
.#noted #2020-07-09

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