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Liveblogging Postwar: October 14, 1946: Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt: My Day:

HYDE PARK, Sunday—Not far from the Houses of Parliament, in the little square near where the United Nations met in London, I used to watch people stop and bare their heads before the statue of Abraham Lincoln. A few days ago I saw in the newspapers that a bill was introduced in Parliament to erect a statue in London in memory of my husband.

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Liveblogging Postwar: October 13, 1946: Germany

=Postwar Germany: Letter from October 13, 1946:

Dear Father Loens !

Let me begin with apologizing to you, in case I may have hurt you in any way in my previous letter. This certainly was not my intention. Perhaps it was a reaction, after all those years in which one had to hold back his/her opinion and in which one had to swallow everything, and as I was accustomed to be frank in conversations with you, and as I knew that you expected such frankness from me, my words may have read more critical as I had intended.

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Liveblogging World War I: October 10, 1916: Eighth Battle of the Isonzo

History.com: Eighth Battle of the Isonzo:

On this day in 1916, Italian forces during World War I initiate the Eighth Battle of the Isonzo, essentially continuing a previous assault on Austrian positions near the Isonzo River and attempting to increase gains made during previous battles in the same region.

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Liveblogging Post-War October 9, 1946: Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt: My Day:

Both the President and Paul Porter of the OPA have very courageously explained to the people of the country why we are at present having a shortage of meat. Incidentally, I was amused yesterday to read of a Kansas farmer who said that he and his family were quite well off and had no desire to visit the cities, which had a meat famine. So the whole country is not starving!

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Liveblogging Postwar: October 7, 1946: Mr. Justice Jackson

by Mr. Justice Jackson: Report to the President:

I have the honor to report as to the duties which you delegated to me on May 2, 1945 in connection with the prosecution of major Nazi war criminals.

The International Military Tribunal sitting at Nurnberg, Germany on 30 September and 1 October, 1946 rendered judgment in the first international criminal assizes in history. It found 19 of the 22 defendants guilty on one or more of the counts of the Indictment, and acquitted 3. It sentenced 12 to death by hanging, 3 to imprisonment for life, and the four others to terms of 10 to 20 years imprisonment.

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Liveblogging World War I: October 6, 1916: Nativism and Isolationism

Whatever It Is, I’m Against It: Today -100: October 6, 1916: There is as much fight in America as in any nation in the world:

The first lawsuit is filed under California’s 1913 Alien Land Law. The state’s assistant attorney general is trying to seize a house purchased by the Harada family in Riverside. Since it was bought by the Harada parents in the name of their three American-born children, who are US citizens, the purchase will be ruled (in 1918) as legal.

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Liveblogging Postwar: October 4, 1946: Immigration into Palestine

Harry S. Truman: Immigration into Palestine:

I have learned with deep regret that the meetings of the Palestine Conference in London have been adjourned and are not to be resumed until December 16, 1946. In the light of this situation it is appropriate to examine the record of the administration's efforts in this field, efforts which have been supported in and not of Congress by members of both political parties, and to state my views on the situation as it now exists.

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Liveblogging Postwar: October 3, 1946: Eleanor Roosevelt

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Eleanor Roosevelt: My Day:

HYDE PARK, Wednesday—I have in the mail a letter which touches so closely the problem of many young couples that I am going to quote it here:

I am the mother of two little boys and expect another baby in March. For over two weeks we have had no red meat, no sugar for puddings, applesauce, etc., and the cost of plain, ordinary foodstuffs is so out of this world that the whole situation is absurd. The American public has become complacent. We literally sit back and take any and all 'orders' issued to us. Maybe we discuss the situation with friends in our own home, but we do nothing. Letters to our Congressmen seem to have lost their value. What can we do?

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Liveblogging Postwar: October 1, 1946: Nuremberg Trial Proceedings

Nuremberg Trial Proceedings:

THE PRESIDENT: The Tribunal will now state those reasons in declaring its Judgment on such guilt or innocence.

GOERING: Goering is indicted on all four Counts. The evidence shows that after Hitler he was the most prominent man in the Nazi regime. He was Commander-in-Chief of the Luftwaffe, Plenipotentiary for the Four Year Plan, and had tremendous influence with Hitler, at least until 1943, when their relationship deteriorated, ending in his arrest in 1945. He testified that Hitler kept him informed of all important military and political problems. From the moment he joined the Party in 1922 and took command of the street-fighting organization, the SA, Goering was the adviser, the active agent of Hitler, and one of the prime leaders of the Nazi movement....

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Liveblogging History: September 29, 1916: Eight Hours

Herald Democrat: Hughes Says He Had Not Urged Senators to Fight President's Eight-Hour Bill:

Saratoga Springs. NV: Charles Evans Hughes told the Republican unofficial state convention here why had not urged Republican senators to filibuster "to the last ditch" against the passage of the Adamson eight-hour law passed to avert the threatened railroad strike.

The nominee declared he did not believe in filibustering for one thing, and that if the majority in congress had determined to pass the bill there was no reason whatever why its passage should have been delayed by filibustering tactics. "It (the administration) acted with swiftness.” Mr. Hughes said "and it cannot now cry that a Republican candidate a thousand miles away should have saved it from carrying out its fixed determination..."


Liveblogging the American Revolution: September 28, 1778: Massacre Averted

Todd Braisted: Massacre Averted: How two British Soldiers saved 350 American Lives:

An officer in Lord Cornwallis’ column wrote that “The 71st Regt. & Simcoe’s Corps cross’d the north river last night and appear’d at Tapawn soon after we arrived there but met with nothing in their way.” Colonel Cooper and his men were gone.

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Liveblogging the American Revolution: September 27, 1778: Baylor Massacre

Wikipedia: Baylor Massacre:

On September 22, 1778, Lt. Gen. Sir Henry Clinton ordered Maj. Gen. Sir Charles Grey, Maj. Gen. Lord Cornwallis, and Brigadier General Edward Mathew to mobilize troops in an effort to provoke Gen. George Washington into a battle...

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Liveblogging the American Revolution: September 24, 1778: Siege of Boonesborough

KyForward.com: Annual re-enactment of 1778 Siege of Boonesborough scheduled for Sept. 24-25:

Fort Boonesborough State Park will host its annual “1778 Siege of Boonesborough” weekend, Sept. 24-25.... The event commemorates the September 1778 attack on the fort by Native Americans and French Canadians during the Revolutionary War. The settlers in the fort refused to surrender, and the attackers gave up and left. Guests are encouraged to arrive early and spend the day learning about 18th-century life in Kentucky. There will be militia and settlers’ camps, a Native American village, merchants, traders, food and more....

In addition to the reconstructed fort, the park also has a campground, hiking trails, mini-golf, picnic shelters and a gift shop.

Fort Boonesborough is located near Richmond. From Interstate 75, take Exit 95 to KY 627. On Interstate 64, exit at Winchester to KY 627. For more information, call 859-527-3131.


Liveblogging the American Revolution: September 23, 1778: John Adams to Abigail Adams

John Adams: To Abigail Adams:

Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 23 September 1778

My dearest Friend

A very idle, vain Conversation, at a Dinner, has produced you this Letter from a venerable old Lady, in this Neighbourhood, the Wife of Monsr. Grand the Banker.

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Liveblogging the American Revolution: September 21, 1778: James McHenry to Alexander Hamilton

James McHenry: To Alexander Hamilton][]:

Fredericksburg, New York, September 21, 1778

Sir,

In order to get rid of your present accumulations you will be pleased to take the pills agreeable to the directions; and to prevent future accumulations observe the following table of diet.

This will have a tendency also to correct your wit.

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Liveblogging the Cold War: September 20, 1946: Eleanor Roosevelt

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Eleanor Roosevelt: My Day:

NEW YORK, Thursday—The "spheres of influence" section of Secretary of Commerce Henry Wallace's speech last week seems to me to have been written without proper explanation. Because Russia has gained a predominant military and political interest in certain countries along her borders, and because Great Britain has always shown the same type of interest in countries along what are known as her "life lines," and because we in this Hemisphere find that we have similar interests with our neighbors, many people feel that we must of necessity accept the fact that there will be spheres of influence in the future. However, I really think this matter requires a little more thinking through.

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Lievblogging the Cold War: September 19, 1946: Harry S. Truman

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Harry S. Truman: Typed Note: September 19, 1946:

Sept. 19, '46

Mr. Wallace spent 2 1/2 hours talking to me yesterday. I'm not so sure he's as fundamentally sound intellectually as I had thought. He advised me that I should be far to the "left" when Congress was not in session and that I should move right when Congress is on hand and in session. He said F.D.R. did that and F.D. never let his "right" hand know what his "left" hand did!

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Liveblogging the American Revolution: September 18, 1778: TD

To Benjamin Franklin from T[homas] D[igges], 18 September 1778:

Bir[mingha]m Sepr. 18./78Sir

My having an oppertunity to forward this under cover to my freind Mr. I[zar]d, induces me to obtrude a few lines on You. Mr. Alex[ande]r Dick and some companions of his was lately with me, and their situation and circumstances demanded of me every alleviation of their wants that I had in my power to afford them; in the doing of which I was obligd to take Mr. Dicks bill on You dated Bristol Sepr. 8, ten days sight, for twenty six pounds Sterling, which bill I shall keep until a favourable oppertunity offers of remitting it to some freind in France.

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Liveblogging World War I: September 16, 1916: Hindenburg Line

History.com: Hindenburg gives order to strengthen German defenses:

On September 16, 1916, one month after succeeding Erich von Falkenhayn as chief of the German army’s general staff during World War I, General Paul von Hindenburg orders the construction of a heavily fortified zone running several miles behind the active front between the north coast of France and Verdun, near the border between France and Belgium.

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Liveblogging Postwar: September 15, 1946: Letter from Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman_:

[The White House] September 15, 1946

Dear Bess:

Well it is a beautiful Sunday morning and I slept until six-thirty after going to bed at two. I was intending to go up to the mountain Friday but it turned so cold I was sure it would be uncomfortable.

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Liveblogging the Cold War: September 14, 1946: Franco-Vietnam Modus Vivendi

Franco-Vietnam Modus Vivendi of September 14th, 1946:

Viet-Nam nationals in France, French nationals in Viet-Nam will enjoy the same freedom of “establishment” as nationals, as well as freedom of opinion, of teaching, of commerce, of circulation, and more generally all democratic liberties.

French property and enterprises in Viet-Nam may not be submitted to a stricter regime than that accorded property and enterprises of Viet-Nam nationals, particularly with regard to taxes and labor legislation. This legal equality will be accorded on a reciprocal basis to the property and enterprises of Viet-Nam nationals in the territories of the French Union.

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Liveblogging Postwar: September 13, 1946: Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman

Letter from Harry S Truman to Bess W Truman September 13 1946 Truman Papers Family Business and Personal Affairs Papers

Harry S. Truman: To Bess W. Truman:

The White House
September 13, 1946

Dear Bess:

I failed to answer your question about your car. It seems to me that if you can get a good price for it you may as well sell it and buy a bond, and then when we leave the great white jail a new car can be bought. The new cars won't have the bugs out of them for two or three years anyway. Be sure though that no regulations or price ceilings are in any way infringed, no matter how good you may think the friendship of the person you sell to may be. The temptation to take a crack at the first family for pay is almost irresistible and so far we've escaped any factual misdemeanor and I'd like to finish with that reputation. Save the number.

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Liveblogging Postwar: September 12, 1946: Henry Wallace

Henry wallace september 12 1946 Google Search

enry A. Wallace: The Way To Peace:

First off, I want to give my own personal endorsement to the candidates chosen by the Democratic Party and the American Labor Party in New York. James Mead long has been one of the ablest public servants in Washington—a constant, faithful and intelligent proponent of the New Deal of Franklin Roosevelt. The Senate will miss him—but Albany needs him. He will make a great governor—worthy of the tradition of Smith and Roosevelt and Lehman.

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Liveblogging Postwar: September 11, 1946: The Truculent Turtle

38 September 11 1946 A Lockheed P2 V 1 Neptune The Truculent Turtle sets a new distance record of 11 235 miles 18 082 km Landing in Columbus O Pinterest

September 11, 1946:

September 11, 1946: A Lockheed P2 V-1 Neptune “The Truculent Turtle” sets a new distance record of 11,235 miles (18,082 km), Landing in Columbus, Ohio from Perth, Australia, after a 55 h and 18 min unrefueled flight and with a nine-month-old gray kangaroo, a gift from Australia for the Washington, D. C. zoo.


Liveblogging Postwar: September 10, 1946: Eleanor Roosevelt

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Eleanor Roosevelt: My Day:

HYDE PARK, Monday—At last I am going to tell you about a bill in which I have been interested for some time. It has been introduced in both the House and the Senate and has strong bipartisan backing. It would establish a Labor Extension Service within the Department of Labor. It would provide for a $10,000,000 to $15,000,000 grants-in-aid program to land-grant colleges and universities, and to other colleges, universities and educational institutions which are prepared to spend their resources and teaching facilities for the benefit of the 45,000,000 wage and salary earners.

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Liveblogging Postwar: September 9, 1946: Eleanor Roosevelt

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Eleanor Roosevelt: My Day:

HYDE PARK, Sunday—It is serious and sad reading that we cannot reach peaceful decisions between employers and employees without strikes, even when so much is at stake as in the tie-up of our shipping. When you realize that this not only means losses to employers, shippers and wage-earners, but also may result in actual starvation in many countries throughout the world, you wonder why it is not possible for reasonable men to come to just arrangements.

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Liveblogging the American Revolution: September 8, 1778: General Orders,

George washington white plains headquarters september 8 1778 Google Search

George Washington: General Orders:

Head-Quarters W. Plains Tuesday Septr 8th 1778.

Parole Oakingham—C. Signs Orton Onslow.

The Colonels and Commanding Officers of Corps are to cause Company rolls to be made out with all possible expedition, comprehending the names of their men actually in the Field, on Command and in hospitals and particularly noting the time for which they are engaged to serve—These rolls are to be regimentally bound up and delivered to the Brigadiers or officers commanding Brigades who are to transmit them to Head-Quarters as soon as they have obtain’d full returns of their respective Commands.

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Liveblogging the American Revolution: September 7, 1778: Siege of Boonesborough

Boonesborough Google Search

Wikipedia: Siege of Boonesborough:

In 1777, British officials opened a new front in the war with the American colonists by recruiting and arming Native American war parties to raid the Kentucky settlements. Henry Hamilton, the British Lieutenant Governor of Canada at Fort Detroit, found willing allies in leaders such as Chief Blackfish of the Shawnees, who hoped to drive the Americans out of Kentucky and reclaim their hunting grounds. As the raids intensified, Americans who strayed from fortified settlements like Boonesborough were likely to be killed or captured. American Indians brought 129 scalps and 77 prisoners to Hamilton in 1777.

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Liveblogging Postwar: September 6, 1946: James Byrnes: Restatement of Policy on Germany.

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James Byrnes: Restatement of Policy on Germany:

I have come to Germany to learn at first hand the problems involved in the reconstruction of Germany and to discuss with our representatives the views of the United States Government as to some of the problems confronting us. We in the United States have given considerable time and attention to these problems because upon their proper solution will depend not only the future well-being of Germany, but the future well-being of Europe. We have learned, whether we like it or not, that we live in one world, from which world we cannot isolate ourselves. We have learned that peace and well-being are indivisible and that our peace and well-being cannot be purchased at the price of peace or the well-being of any other country.

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Liveblogging Postwar: September 5, 1946: Eleanor Roosevelt

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Eleanor Roosevelt: My Day:

ALBANY, N.Y. Wednesday—The first day of the Democratic State Convention came to an end with a feeling of enthusiasm, I think, among all those present. I am quite sure that we will be told that this feeling has been equally present at the convention which the Republicans are holding in Saratoga Springs.

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Liveblogging the American Revolution: September 4, 1778: Grey's Raid

Wikipedia: Grey's Raid:

In response to the threat to Newport, General Sir Henry Clinton ordered 4,000 men under General Charles Grey to prepare for transport to Rhode Island while Admiral Lord Richard Howe sailed from New York to oppose d'Estaing.... By the time they arrived at Newport on September 1, the Americans had not only been put on the defensive, but had retreated from the island after the inconclusive August 29 Battle of Rhode Island.

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Liveblogging Postwar: September 3, 1946: Eleanor Roosevelt

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Eleanor Roosevelt: My Day: September 3, 1946:

HYDE PARK, Monday—There are two professions which evidently no longer appeal to either men or women, and yet in the past they were the two which drew the most intelligent people—people who wanted not only to make money but to be of real service in the world. One is the teaching profession and the other is the nursing profession.

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Liveblogging World War I: September 2, 1916: Zeppelins

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History in the Headlines: London’s World War I Zeppelin Terror:

The British also began to target the zeppelins’ major vulnerability, their highly flammable hydrogen. By mid-1916, they had developed airplanes that could reach higher altitudes and fire both explosive bullets, which could tear large holes into a zeppelin’s outer skin and allow oxygen to pour into the hydrogen chambers, and incendiary bullets, which could light the volatile gaseous cocktail on fire.

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